PHABRIK Magazine

Spring/Summer 2012

Daniel Libeskind’s Reflections at Keppel Bay, Singapore

BY JOÃO PAULO NUNES

Architect Daniel Libeskind has completed ‘The Reflections at Keppel Bay’, a series of aluminium-clad residential towers in Keppel Harbor, Singapore. This is Libeskind’s first residential project in Asia, and his largest completed residential project to date. The six glazed curved towers, that range between 24 and 41 floors feature rooftop gardens and are connected to one another by elevated bridges. The development also includes 11 low-rise villa apartment blocks that range between 6 and 8 floors. Overall, the two-million-square-foot residential development comprises a total of 1,129 units.


Paramount

- Photographer: Javier Ortega - Hair: Joseph Dimaggio for L’Oreal Professionnel - Hair assistant: Jessica Swanson - Makeup: Anneliese Tieckn - Model: Aurelia Ford Models NYC - Nails: Julie Kandalec for Zoya - Art director/Stylist: Sandra Sing Fernandes - Location: Paramount Hotel New York


Homme Scents | Scent of a Woman

- Photography/Digital Art: studio-e.ca - Art Direction: James Kershaw Homme Scents Each season cosmetic and fragrance houses around the globe launch new scents to tempt the consumer.These scents may be completely new or reinterpretations of existing ones. Spicebomb by Victor & Rolf is a new companion scent to the design duo’s Flowerbomb scent for women the house launched in 2005. Burberry has created a limited edition version of their classic Burberry Brit men’s scent, Brit summer edition will be available until July. The house of Thierry Mugler presents A*MEN Pure Shot, this limited edition scent is comprised of exotic ingredients such as freezing mint, juniper berry and sequoia. Represented by Oscar Pistorius, this record holding 24 year old Paralympics sprinter runs on black carbon fibre prosthetics due to a double leg amputation and has qualified for the 2012 Summer Olympics to be held in London. The fragrance is meant to incarnate the athlete’s powerful strength and desire for victory. Scent of a Woman The fragrance industry is always in a constant state of change. Every season a mind boggling array of completely new or fresh versions of existing scents is introduced into the marketplace. Three of the scents featured are from renowned fashion houses. Elie Saab gained worldwide notoriety when Halle Berry wore the designer to the Academy Awards the year she won the first best actress Oscar awarded to a black actress.The house’s first fragrance was successfully launched in 2011. Burberry, the historic British fashion house recognized for the development of the trench coat and an iconic plaid, is introducing a limited edition of their Burberry Body scent,, an alcohol free body mist. Anna Sui, the New York based designer known for her free spirited collections is adding to her Secret Wish collection of fragrances with Fairy Dance, a fruity, floral, musky scent. Two of the fragrances are from houses known for primarily for footwear, Jimmy Choo and Nine West. Jimmy Choo expands their collection by introducing a lighter Eau de Toilette version of their first scent launched last year. Love Fury marks Nine West’s initial foray into the world of fragrance, the woody, floral, oriental scent is housed in a bottle cleverly topped with a stiletto shaped stopper. Swarovski synonymous with everything crystal, launches the limited edition Aura by Swarovski Collection Mariage, a light Eau de Toilette (shown),along with a crystal studded collectors edition bottle, a perfumed hair mist and a crystal embellished lip gloss compact.


Saving Face

- Photography/Digital Art: studio-e.ca - Art Direction: James Kershaw There is a constant struggle to maintain an adequate hydration level in the skin. The effects of extreme weather conditions,(all too familiar to Canadians), central heating and air conditioning all contribute to skin’s water loss. These not only contribute to the feeling of discomfort, but also the visible signs of too little water in the skin’s surface layers, such as fIne lines, a dull appearance, and flakiness. The beauty industry has responded with a vast array of potions, lotions and elixirs to help alleviate the problem. Clarins, long known for their expertise in all things relating to beauty are relaunching their Face Treatment Oils. Introduced in the mid 1960’s and unchanged in formula since then, they are composed of aromatic essential oils and plant extracts to aid in rebalancing the skin. The newly repackaged oils (the 30ml. bottle now comes with a dropper to precisely measure the amount needed ) will be at Clarins counters nationwide in April. Clinique, another renowned skin care company recently introduced Moisture Surge Intense Skin Fortifying Hydrator for very dry and delicate skin. The product helps to correct and maintain the moisture barrier allowing the skin to retain an elevated level of hydration. Comfort zone, a well known spa line of skin treatments offers hydramemory fluid 24h, which helps to maintain an ample moisture level in the epidermis for up to 24 hours. A lack of water in the skin is a problem that can occur at any age. A loss of firmness is characterized by skin slackening, a loss of elasticity, and the appearance of wrinkles and usually affects women in their forties. Clarins introduces new Extra Firming Day and Night Creams in two formulas, one for dry skins, one for all skin types and is available nationwide now. Clinique’s newest age fighter was also developed to fight the loss of firmness, their Repairwear Uplifting firming cream is used morning and evening after your appropriate 3-step skin care regimen and is also available in two formulas.


Stanley Carroll

By Vickie Laliotis

Designing Outside of the Box Sitting at a small, circular table adorned with a telephone and a lone sketchbook, Stanley Carroll appears poised yet inherently at ease. The designer — who first launched his eponymous label three decades ago — has the air of an accomplished creative-type, speaking confidently yet modestly about his long list of accomplishments. The most notable of which, however, is his resolve to honour artistic integrity above all else. “In being the kind of designer that I try to be, the focus is primarily creative,” Carroll says from his Edmonton studio. “You’re working in a professional environment so you have to address the realities of a commercial industry, but at the crux you’re trying to make a creative statement that’s true to you. If I don’t think a dress is exemplary of my style, I won’t use it no matter how good it is.” This dedication and self-assuredness has come to define the designer, whose aesthetic is a rare breed of minimalism peppered with European sophistication. The latter comes from a childhood spent in Holland, before Carroll relocated to Canada with his family at age 16. “The minimalistic aspect of my clothing is what makes it believable, while the European twist is what keeps it interesting,” he says. “My brain will always lean towards a European mindset of dressing for a number of reasons. Stylistically, I think Europeans tend to be a bit more comfortable in their skin and are more inclined to experiment, which really inspires me.” Apart from European street style and café culture, Carroll’s influences vary seasonally and encompass everything from travel and literature, to pop culture and even his own life. This season, Carroll sums up his sartorial offerings in three words: Happy, whacky and eclectic. The latter stems from the diverse fabrics Carroll sourced from around the world, lending equal parts whimsy (think dresses covered with airy clouds) and ethnic appeal (sari materials and tribal-inspired prints) to the collection. “The fabric story is bigger for me this season that usual, so there’s more print and a lot more colour than I normally use,” he says. “I still experiment with shape and volume, but this use of fabric has provided a new aesthetic for me.” The designer could have based his company out of a more fashion-forward city, yet true to maverick form, he chose instead to call Edmonton home. This calculated move speaks not only to Carroll’s individuality, but to his rejection of prescribed industry standards as well. “I’ve always found it very limiting, and after a while you start to question why things are done a certain way,” he says. “So there are a number of things that I looked at that the industry does for understandable reasons, but I decided it’s just not for me.” Like limiting himself to creating on a seasonal basis, or even selling his collections through retailers. Instead, the veteran designer creates on an ongoing basis, opting to sell his work online and through pop-up shops, a method he finds particularly successful. “The one great advantage to living and working in a place like Edmonton is that there are no rules; if I were in Toronto I would have been stylistically pigeonholed a lot sooner, where looks and markets are determined for you. You might do well commercially, but creatively you work in a box.” And if there’s one thing that Stanley Carroll is not, it’s creatively stifled. “What you encounter each and every day will to some extent impact you, and people who work in creative environments tend to develop their voice this way,” he says. “Simply put, inspiration comes by waking up every morning and looking around.” Style blogger Andrew Eirich credits Carroll as a major influence, and has admired his work since he first saw the designer present his Spring/Summer collection at Western Canada Fashion Week last year. “Stanley has a chicness and simplicity to his designs that make them incredible and timeless. The ease and elegance of his clothing stems from his natural ability to understand and create great fashion,” Eirich says.     Models: Andrew & Elizabeth Makeup: Amber Prepchuk Photographer: Richard Siemens


Homme Based

- Model: Kent - Styling: James Kershaw - Photography/Digital art: Studio-e.ca Men’s skincare has come a long way in the past decade and so have the attitudes men have concerning the care of their skin. The stigma surrounding men that once used skin preparations as overtly narcissistic, vain beings with unadulterated egos has been replaced with one of a informed man concerned with health, vitality and well-being. Looking and feeling good in your skin is no longer just the privilege of women. Major cosmetic houses on both sides of the globe have extensive lines based on the special needs of a man’s skin. A male’s skin is often thicker, oilier and can have a coarser appearance than his female counterparts. All issues are now addressed, protection from the elements, hydration, post shaving calming and soothing of the skin. Zone specific areas such as the eyes have there own unique set of problems and solutions. Clinique Skin Supplies For Men’s new Anti-fatigue Cooling Eye Gel roll on revitalizes,and brightens while combating puffiness and dark circles. ClarinsMen Age Control Line Control Eye Balm revitalizes, lifts and firms, and reduces puffiness ideal for the more mature male. Exfoliation is key to a clear glowing complexion, Clinique Skin Supplies For Men’s Face Scrub prepares the skin for shaving, it removes dead skin and oil buildup, lifts the beard to reduce ingrown hair development. ClarinsMen new Exfoliating Cleanser (June availability) deep cleanses, purifies and refines the skin with natural lava powder, natural micro beads and micro spheres of salicylic acid while eliminating toxins that can dull the complexion. Comfort Zone MANSPAce Hydra Performer After-Shave Restoring Hydrator replenishes lost moisture due to shaving restoring the skin’s natural defenses.


Fur, What’s All the Fuzz?

By Mark St. James - Marquis of Fashion

Fur: the facts, the controversy, the fashion! The use of fur in fashion has become such a point of contention that it leaves most designers coughing up fur balls. But when was the last time we took a step back from the anti-fur mob mentality, and took a look at the facts surrounding the topic? In my previous article in Phabrik Magazine I focused on the growing movement in Eco-fashion and sustainability within the fashion industry. It may shock you to learn just how Eco-friendly the use of fur can be. Having always been one to make up my own mind, I embarked on a mission to determine fact from fiction and propaganda from reality in order to shed some much needed light on this highly debated topic. After a tremendous amount of research, I have to say, I am pro-fur... no sense beating around the bush. Now, before you condemn me, hear me out. For Your Consideration: Have you ever stopped to consider the impact petroleum products have on the eco system? It’s interesting, if not confounding that so many people are eager to jump on the fur trashing waggon, yelling on their megaphones, and holding up signs made of wood, plastic, and paper when in reality, forests where cut down for those signs and entire ecosystems where moved or destroyed for the oil necessary for the plastics and other synthetic materials that produced the marker that wrote the message. How many animals were harmed so protesters can protest?Why not use synthetic fur in place of theanimals?As stated above the use of synthetics requires greater devastation then using the real thing. Fur only requires the use of an animals hide, the only environmentally harmful process in refining the fur for use in fashion is the dying process which is optional, and may be substituted with organic dyes. Now before we move on, I want address the fundamental issue surrounding fur and the reason it is such a heated issue, the ethical treatment of animals. Obviously this a broad topic, so for the sake of this article, let’s keep it in the fur trade. There exists two important points here: 1) The quality of life of the animals living in a fur farm are regulated by laws set by governing bodies. These regulations ensure that the animals enjoy a life that is nearly as comfortable as that of a house pet. These laws are very specific and well enforced. 2) The misdirected protesting and lobbying against government regulated farms. This protesting has led to a number of fur farms closing up shop... a victory for the persecutors? Maybe in their minds; but sadly all that is being accomplished is a shift from controlled environments to the black market. This is where one has to take a stand, poaching and the black market sale of fur is abhorrent. The fact is, the demand for fur is and will always be present, in fact, it has been there all through history. With regulated farms, the treatments of the animals is assured, and without those farms, the black market flourishes. Rather counter-productive to put so much time and energy into closing fur farms especially when considering the consequences. It’s not unlike throwing red paint on a fur coat during fashion week... fur is typically insured... the coat will be replaced; Counter-productive. The More You Know: Fur farms account for 63% of all fur usage in Canada, this number is approximately 1.6 million pelts per year. Of this number these animals are cared for by the best veterinarians, they are fed a balanced diet every day, and they are cared for and monitored with the use of the regulated and legally required healthcare and breeding records. Unfortunately the 65,000 people working in the fur trade in Canada alone are under constant attack from Eco-fundamentalists who make it their mission to pass on misinformation which results in the loss of jobs and potentially the traditional art of fur crafting. At this point it seems moot to discuss the use of leather in fashion and how in the midst of all the hype, few forums touch upon the fact that the majority of anti-fur advocates wear leather products and eat meat. Fur Today: So with all this fur who is wearing it? I know as a fashion columnist and blogger I love to wear a fur stole or fur trim on my collars, cuffs, and hoods but who else is wearing fur? Many high profile celebrities wear fur such as Madonna, Sienna Miller, Jennifer Lopez, Rihanna, Lady Gaga, Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen, and the list goes on and on but are celebs the only ones wearing fur? Since fur is found on nearly every type of outerwear on the trim of a hood etc. the masses are investing in fur from popular accessible brands like Andrew Marc, Danier Leather, and Canada Goose, making fur very practical. Although full fur coats are not as popular on the streets today, they are hitting the runways hard for Fall 2012. Nearly every collection used fur in some way and the shift in perspective is looking great. Noted fur advocate Karl Lagerfeld used fur in nearly every look at the Fendi Fall 2012 show. Other collection that invested in the trendy renewable resource were Marc Jacobs, Celine, Hermès, Yves Saint Laurent, Gucci, Zac Posen, and newcomer Altuzarra. With this much of the fluffy fuzz on the catwalk I can guarantee that it will be showing up more frequently on the streets; and if you can’t afford your own fur, simply dive into your grandmothers or grandfathers wardrobe and take out one of their old furs, or visit your local vintage shop. Remember, fur unlike other materials, is wonderfully resilient and can stand the test of time. You’ll often see fur being past down from generation to generation for over half a century or more. Once it has run its course, it is nice to know that it will degrade naturally and will not add to the tonnes and tonnes of cheap disposable synthetic fabrics that make up a significant percentage of our landfills. Finally, I have to pose the question, “What is more Eco-Friendly?” Fur? Or piles of non-biodegradable synthetic materials? Has the use of fur become so plagued with unnecessary guilt and misinformation that we would turn our backs on a proven, quality and sustainable material? In the Interest of Sharing, Fun Facts: - $800 million - The amount of money that goes directly into the Canadian economy from the fur trade each year. - http://www.furcouncil.com - 65,000 - The amount of people working in the fur trade in Canada. - http://www.fur.ca - 63% - The amount of Canadian furs that come from fur farms. - http://www.fur.ca - 1.6 million - The number of pelts produced from fur farms in Canada. - http://www.fur.ca - 1 billion - The number of cows that a killed each year for their leather. - http://www.peta.org/ - Hydrogen Chloride - The toxic gas released when creating synthetic textiles. - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov - 9% - The percentage of man made textiles in landfills. - 2020 - The year the world’s supply of oil and gas will fall below the level required to meet international demand. http://www.theinsider.org Warm, fashionable, renewable, environmentally friendly, regulated...FUR.


Jameson House in Vancouver by Foster + Partners

By João Paulo Nunes

Architecture firm Foster + Partners have unveiled images of Jameson House, a new 35-storey mixed-use tower in the heart of Vancouver and the practice’s first in Canada. Completed at the end of last year and almost fully occupied at present, the project combines the restoration of heritage buildings with new construction. The scheme integrates two 1920s Beaux Arts structures: the entire internal double-height volume of the A-listed Ceperley Rounsfell Building (which has been returned to its original configuration) and the B-listed Royal Financial Building (whose façade has been retained). The development comprises 11 storeys of offices and shops, topped by 23 storeys of apartments.The tower’s form articulates these different functions: the first two storeys continue the row of shop units at street level, while the uppermost office floor aligns with the cornice line of the adjacent building. Contrasting with the flush façade of the offices, the residential floors curve outwards in four wide bays, which are staggered to allow daylight to reach neighbouring buildings and oriented to provide uninterrupted views of the landscape. The tower’s flexible plan supports a variety of apartment types, with interiors by Foster + Partners and living spaces in the deep curve of the window bays. At the top of the tower are two-storey penthouse apartments and landscaped roof terraces.


Orange Crush | Haute Chocolate | The Ultra-Violets

- Makeup + styling by James Kershaw - Photographs + Digital Art by studio-e.ca Orange Crush Cosmetic houses are enamored with the colour orange this season. As a result, a wide array of beauty products are available in varying intensities of this sun-kissed hue. Bold, intense, colour saturated items scream CHIC!, while sheer lightly pigmented products whisper the message. This spring every feature from eyes, cheeks, lips, even nails can be dressed in this citrusy colour. Could it be love? Maybe. Or just a crush. Haute Chocolate Cosmetic houses always have an ample supply of rich chocolaty hues available. This spring they are an ideal contrast to the season’s acid bright and pretty pastel garments and the perfect compliment to the ubiquitous ivory, beige and camel items in store each spring. Bobbi Brown’s Rich Brown matte and Chocolate Shimmer Wash eye shadows accessorized with Clinique’s Intense Chocolate Quickliner for Eyes creates a warm smoky eye. Jane Iredale’s Chemistry In Touch Blush imparts a dewy pink chocolate gleam to the cheeks with a formula enriched with cocoa extract that emits an intoxicating chocolate scent. Layer Clarins’ Chocolate lip liner pencil with their new Gloss Prodige in Chocolate for a sexy deep nude mouth. A dark lacquered manicure is de rigueur, OPI’s "Suzy Says Da!" would be ideal or "Chocolate Moose" for those seeking something more subtle. The Ultra-Violets Whether you seek a 1950’s inspired ultra-feminine, classic look or an avant-garde, futuristic one, this bluish purple is one of the season’s coolest colours for fashion and beauty. Violet can be found in every category of cosmetic in a wide variety of finishes and intensities. Eyes are accentuated with shimmer and matte shadows (Clarins), and elongated with pencil, cream or liquid liners (Clinique). Cheeks radiate an ethereal lavender glow (Yves Saint Laurent). Whether you crave lips of lavender or a pout of purple, there is a wide range of items available to achieve the desired effect such as lip plumpers (Jane Iredale), glosses (Clarins), lipstick/gloss/balm hybrids (Bodyography, Clinique). Nail this season’s chicest look with amethyst hued polishes (SpaRitual, OPI)


Men’s Trends: Summer 2012

By André Deveaux

The catwalks were awash with color and prints, with the atmosphere one of true summer fun in the sun. Innovative materials and the reinterpretation of traditional ones, such as the net processing on leather, was an overreacting trend. What was most significant however were the more architectural innovations and the reworking of traditional tailoring and proportions, which together bring to light a new fashion for spring/summer 2012. Nomadic Chic We are absolutely in love with this trend! We call this trend “Nomadic Chic” because it takes inspiration from a global collective from Japanese tailoring to American heritage. This trend definitely looks to push an individuals style by opening their eyes to cultures, places and people beyond their immediate proximity. We live in a multicultural environment which is precisely why we picked this as one of our 4 major trending categories. There are no real rules on how to achieve this look aside from taking a deeper look into your culture for inspiration and that of your friends. Fight for Bright Moving forward from the very masculine blue, other brights lit up the catwalks in Milan/Paris. Parrot greens, oranges and highlighter yellow contrasted with warm hues of berry. The trend is easy to wear: interpret it with knitwear or even leather, while for the more daring a few tailored suits in bright fluo pink color made an appearance on the spring/summer 2012 catwalks. All Meshed Up See through mesh knitwear seems to be man’s alternative to lace for women in spring/summer ’12. Sexy yet sophisticated, these knits are the perfect way to show some flesh and keep cool in the summer heat. Why not embrace the trend further and move onto netwear? In Dolce & Gabbana’s spring/summer ’12 collection the net is presented in different sizes, colors and materials and used either transparent or lined for jackets, trousers, shorts, T-shirts, bomber jackets, tracksuits and sweaters. Printed Elegance Prints, prints and more prints! If there is one trend you pick to follow this season then this is “it”. Almost every brand this S/S is indulging in some variation of this trend. Whether you’re mixing plaids with stripes, prints with plaids, solids with prints, or prints on prints, there are no limits to what you can do. How do you nail this look? Well, though this trend appears to have no rules we do suggest maintaining a base color scheme when creating your ensemble. This will enable you to piece together the right items for the perfect look.


©2013 PHABRIK Magazine