PHABRIK Magazine

Culture

Art, Music + Travel

India: Colours of Transport

By Danielle S. Fuechtmann

- Photography by Javier Ortega India is traced with an intricate lace-work pattern of roadways that cover 3,516,452 km (2009). Essential to the growth and survival of rural areas, these roadways provide a link between villages or small farming communities and booming metropolitan centres. However, despite the importance of roads and land transportation, India largely lacks consistent driving regulations and road upkeep. Without regulations and funding, roads are very rough and narrow, major highways are only two lanes, and a significant part of the rural population does not have access to all-weather roads. Even so, travelling around India can be a very enjoyable and exciting thing to do. Public transportation, particularly India’s fast and efficient bus and train systems, is a very popular way to travel, especially through mountain regions inaccessible to car or motorcycle. Buses offer a fast and inexpensive way to travel, even taking regular stops for passengers to go to the washroom or get a snack. Some drivers do take riskier maneuvers though, particularly on quieter night routes, so it’s wise to travel during the day if possible. You can book tickets on state-run buses up to a month in advance, but it’s advised to nab a seat in between the axles to minimize bumping and shaking due to road conditions.  India’s train system is an exciting way to travel, following extensive routes though the beautiful country. With approximately 17 million passengers travelling by train every day, in addition to freight, the Indian Railways is one of the world’s largest employers. The railways are always bustling, but the system is thoughtfully designed and quite efficient. While renting cars and hiring drivers is quite common, particularly in metropolitan areas, more flexible forms of transportation are often more well-adapted to India’s roadways. Bicycles and motorcycles are very popular forms of independent transportation, as they are nimble enough to dart through the congested roads and avoid rough patches. It’s a common sight to see several members of a family riding together on a motorcycle, as well as tourists taking advantage of this flexible form of travel. In response to the popularity of cycles, bicycles and motorized, parts and other related services can be easily found throughout the country. Although less common now because of the dominance of motorized vehicles, traditional rickshaws and other carts, sometimes pulled by animals, can still be found in quieter roadways and communities. Practical and simple, this long-standing way of travel makes up for speed with its endurance and the opportunity it gives to truly recognize the beauty and warmth of the country. Autorickshaws and their variations, the vikram or tempo, marry the traditional rickshaw with a motor, a hybrid able to carry more passengers and achieve greater speed. India is a bustling country; whether you are riding a train, zipping through the streets, or chugging along on an autorickshaw, the vibrant web of transportation provides a lovely window into the daily life and customs of different regions. While moving from place to place can be made more calming with a book and earplugs, taking the time to observe can show little snapshots into the daily life of someone else.


Valentim Quaresma

By Fransico Basconsela

When I’m in the middle of a project I feel like I’m totally inside my dreams, but when a project ends I can never help but feel like I still have a long way to go. How did you start? I started working when I was 16 years old in a store where I made fashion accessories. I worked there for two years and then took a contemporary jewelry course at an art school. Fashion Designer Ana Salazar invited me to create fashion accessories while I was still studying. Because I began my career working with Ana, my creative process has always been very connected to the parameters of fashion. What was your original mission with your work? To be able to live of my creativity and to share my visions with others. Do you ever create things that no one sees? Sometimes I develop work that does not get presented but it is part of my creative process. I call these works “Work in Progress” because that’s literally what it is. They’re four very distinct elements inside a machine that continue to give me ideas for other projects and exploration. How do you like to work? I have to admit that my creative universe works best in chaos; I don’t like to have every thing very organized because it affects the creative flow. I like to look around and see what’s available. I need to experiment with materials. Is experimentation crucial for you? Without a doubt. I’ve tried many different techniques and inspirations, from baroque to tribal, inserting them in different creative processes to see how it would work. I like to turn an ordinary material into something exquisite. At first glance a press-stud seems to only serve the function for which it was created, there’s nothing beautiful about it, but by applying them to a piece, I’m creating a beautiful and luxurious dimension, caused by the texture and achieved by the use of repetition of the same element. I now feel the need to get a little more experimental, even with materials. I don’t have as much time as I’d like to explore them. How do you choose the materials you’re going to work? In the beginning I would have an idea and then look for the appropriate materials to execute it. There came a time when I realized I could do the reverse as there are materials that give me ideas and bring relevant concepts. Now, the creative process happens both ways. It’s an enormous challenge to pick up an object and try to imagine how else it could work. It brings me great joy, when the original object becomes unrecognizable. During the creative process, do you make the distinction between your fashion pieces and art pieces? I know that many people look at my work and wonder if it’s wearable as some pieces can go from a fashion collection and can then be displayed in a gallery. The work process is the same but it makes sense to separate these two aspects of creation. Do you always keep in mind the commercial and marketable aspect of a piece? I don’t allow myself to be dictated by that. When I create a piece that’s not as commercial, I try to refine it in order to make it more wearable, which doesn’t make it any easier or less creative. It doesn’t lose its worth, but I know my customer and know what works. In my case I can’t oversimplify, otherwise it doesn’t capture the attention of those who like my work. You’ve always collaborated with other artists from different fields. Do you enjoy the creative exchange? I really enjoy it. I’m always touched when I conceive a piece that is then transported to the universe of a photographer. Its exciting and working this way can learn a lot. All my life I’ve worked in open studios shared with other artists and I find it far more constructive than working in isolation. Does the fact that every six months you have to present a new collection keep the creative juices flowing? Absolutely. And many ideas not fully explored in one collection can be put to use in another, it’s an ongoing process. There are techniques I discovered 2 years ago that are still to be applied, and I will return to them, the process is never just six months. Your 20 year career was celebrated with a retrospective exhibition in 2010. How did it feel looking back at your work? It was complex when it came to collecting all the pieces. Much has happened in 20 years and it was good to look back... The pieces enabled me to visualize who I once was; it’s interesting to see the evolution of my work. At the end, the pieces had to interact with each other and I must admit it was an interesting dialogue. What are hardships you experienced being an artist? The biggest difficulty is to work without financial support. Particularly at the beginning of a career You really do have to learn from your mistakes. In school, you learn to draw, work with materials, and develop a project, but no one teaches you how to sustain a creativity-based business. It’s very hard to focus on your work when you have to do all the equally crucial things like contacting clients and collectors, promote your work, etc. All without which success is rather impossible. What is you ultimate mission? To show people my creative world within. Are you closer to realizing your dream? When I’m in the middle of a project I feel like I’m totally inside my dreams, but when a project ends I can never help but feel like I still have a long way to go.


Max and Me

By Drake Garnitz

that Sunday on a corner in la Bastille Max roller-skating leader of the pack leading us leading me across the bridge across the Seine but pas sufi for Max and me it is not enough so we continue to Sacre-Coeur and there is no film needed no flash required to capture our journey this camera is internal every second a portrait imprinted as we move through light through dark sans wheels into the night the day the week our dance spilling onto the balcony spinning atop the roof twirling high above the boulevard together we dance nearly naked in body so naked in spirit we continue over then under le Pont-Neuf across le Pont-des Arts up, up, up among the very lights of la Tour Eiffel we continue to continue the dance our dance the beat our beat and this picture of Max and me framed internally can be carried from here to there to any of my imprinted anywheres.     - Photograph by Fani Kanawati


Deolinda Bernardo

By Danielle S. Fuechtmann

At the age of fourteen, Deolinda Bernardo decided she wanted to dedicate her career to keeping the Portuguese tradition of fado music alive. Deolinda began singing at a very early age, cultivating a love and passion for music. Although she spent the first years of her musical career singing contemporary styles such as pop and rock, her difficult childhood made the emotion and power of fado an appealing creative outlet. Fado’s origins trace back to before the nineteenth century, spreading out from Lisbon to other regions in Portugal, gradually developing distinct regional styles. A bit like North American blues music, fado requires precise and delicate technique to tell very passionate and emotional stories. The music requires active listening, leading it to be compared to opera; fado songs often require some knowledge of the tradition and subject matter carries emotional significance. In Lisbon, fado music has developed a modern flavour, with influences from Africa and Brazil, the style in this region has developed a unique urban feel. The northern areas of Portugal take on a Celtic sound, while the middle regions of Portugal absorb inspiration from their southern neighbor, Spain. In the southern-central countryside of Alentejo, the music has North African influences. These influences reflect Portugal’s interesting pattern of trade and political relationships with the countries surrounding it. The most distinct of the regional styles comes from Coimbra, and is occasionally referred to as student fado. This style is recognizable for it’s exclusively male voices, and was made popular by the large student population in the city. Deolinda developed a love for music and singing at a very early in her life, and it was a constant in her difficult childhood. At 3 years old, separated from her mother, she began listening to the radio at her grandmother’s home where she was living. As she grew older she began singing, primarily in rock, jazz, and pop styles while working in a factory. Around this time she began to delve into the fado tradition, finding herself able to connect to the emotional stories the songs shared. When she was about fourteen, she recognized that her passion was something she truly wanted to share, and despite the difficult path pursing music would entail, she decided to follow it. As a young single mother, the life of a musician was not easy. She spent much of her twenties singing in hotel piano bars. These nights were difficult and often thankless, but she learned many things about performing and developed as an artist. Fado is a very technical music form with significant regional variances, and Deolinda took care to learn about all of them, becoming proficient in many of the styles and learning an extensive repertoire of classic songs. She performs with great enthusiasm and joy, educating her listeners about the traditions and songs as she is singing. Luckily, youth are beginning to develop an interest in fado again, with artists like Mariza, who performs a pop-fado fusion, performing to large audiences and generating new interest into the traditional style. As a result this traditional music is experiencing a resurgence. Currently, she performs weekly in Obidos, a castle in central Portugal. The castle is unique, as it is one of few that people still live in. The perfect location for Deolinda to share her traditional music, Obidos has a vibrant culture, hosting markets and medieval fairs requiring period dress. She performs at Troca-Tontas each Monday night, a small intimate venue serving traditional food. Despite singing with no microphone, her voice fills the room with ease. Deolinda loves performing and watching the eyes of her audience and soaking in their energy, and this shows through her endearing nature and charisma. She will also be performing and leading a seminar on the first Monday of each month at PHABRIK in Serra del Rei, which will be open to all ages. For the last 15 years, Deolinda has travelled and performed with her partner and best friend, Jose Piras, a fellow musician. Sharing a core musical philosophy has made it natural for them to work together. An excellent musician in his own right, he frequently accompanies her singing, covers male parts, and writes his own music. Together, they share an intense performing schedule, frequently performing more than once a day, as well as travelling, within Portugal and internationally.


PULSE: Acoustic Discourse on Harmony and Chaos

By Chantele Theroux

You knew the beating rhythm of a heart before you could breathe. We are flesh and bone, born to resonate and can feel sound. Your heart lives as the metronome for the rhythm inside you, and has evolved to synchronize with other living systems, and our earth as a whole. The intuitive creation of this abstract communication forms a flowing balance, creating a quiet, colossal symphony veiled by inexpressible colour and sound. The seemingly imperceptible mystery and intrigue of this connection can be felt and the vibrational interplay heard inside you, through music. By random and intelligent design, music is a collective manifestation that echoes the wonder of all life. Through this resonance and within the audible space of stillness, rhythmic solidarity is born through sound. We are made in and of music. It can be interpreted into sound by one being, and perceived as math by another. Likewise, music can be created mathematically, and relayed acoustically to others. It transcends and combines the disciplines of mathematics, astral and quantum physics to become a truly universal language. It expresses the wondrous relationships between the celestial bodies and our earth, the other planets, the sun, and solar systems. The shifting proportions, balances, distances, and vibrations can be measured both scientifically, and felt with the heart. The perspective that music is a living, breathing organism is acutely felt in the band PULSE, the master project of Martin Johann Kloppers. An accomplished Canadian cellist/composer/artist, he merges his lifetime of musicianship and artistic visionary exploration with a perplexing array of creative skills, including TIG-welding. He began this musical journey at age five, making his own wooden instruments and by age seven, he began pursuing private cello studies. By fifteen he was composing his own music. Martin was also a founding member and the electric cellist of the enigmatic ARIA award-winning group, ‘Feeding like Butterflies’. He earned his technical chops with a Bachelor of Music (cello performance) and is a self-taught drummer/percussionist. As a result, the visually stunning instrumentation and eclectically beautiful music is rich in depth and interest. PULSE combines musical influences from all over the world, film score, alternative, pop, and dance genres, all blended by the masterful instrumentation, timeless mood, and precise orchestral layering. The result evokes scenery, images, and stories only limited by the imagination of the listener. It’s best described as a soundtrack, encompassing nearly every genre, making it a truly universal experience. It alludes to the inexplicable beauty of the universe, its creatures, and the great abstract of unexplored wonder and brilliance. It is the imaginative vision of PULSE that makes it a truly timeless innovation; combining the future and past, and the mystical beauty of accidental order. The ‘Cellotaur’ & Global Drums Martin has handcrafted PULSE’s exquisite showcase instruments, which embody complete originality in artistic endeavour, beginning with the ‘Cellotaur’. The inspiration for its distinctive shape is based on a symphony of scientific, archaeological, and fantasy-based thinking, asking the question, ‘If cellos were living musical creatures, and we discovered their remains on a distant planet, what would those remains look like?’ It is a world-class sculpture, painting, and living musical instrument, and unlike traditional cellos, is not dependent on the body for sound-resonance, but truly electric. Its final shape is visually-striking; a delicate balance of feminine lines with a deliciously dark, macabre undertone. Its very existence changes our perception and notion of possibility in music, and the universe. In a similar fashion, the Global Drums symbolize the celestial bodies; planets, moons and suns, glowing orbs that all communicate through vibration in PULSE. They range in size, the largest being four feet in diameter and their unique lightweight TIG-welded design allows for overhead suspension, rotation, and movement. With built-in backlighting, the drums come alive with booming color and energy. They attune the vibrational connection of life, different times, and distant places. Many of the musical compositions and pieces performed in PULSE have over a hundred recorded cello or instrumental ‘layers’, expressing the complex link between the physical world, the imagined, and the infinite composition of music and science. Martin’s piece ‘Kududance’ is one example, and it emulates the creatures of Africa, his birthplace. Through this immense symphony of sound, PULSE blends a cacophony of electronics, signals, and waves and integrates musical inspiration from even the smallest creatures on our planet. Add to that the haunting and expressive vocals of Kirtan artist Sparrow Grace, and PULSE’s ‘world-electric’ genre is alive with the energy of our earth. PULSE is a masterful expression of the harmony and chaos of human experience becoming alive and present, and a communication with the universe.Every village has a drum. Every person has a voice. Every body has a PULSE. PULSE is beating at: pulseworld.ca


It’s Not My First Rodeo, Oh Wait, Yes It Is

By Stacey Mullings

There are a multitude of reasons why music is important in our lives. It’s an expression of our triumphs and struggles; be they personal, social or political. Something to cry to, laugh to, head bang or cut a rug to. When a piece of music resonates powerfully with the listener, it can be incredibly comforting; almost as though the songwriter took the words right out of his or her mouth. For me, that is one of the main things that separate “the greats” from the mediocre artists. That ability to reassure the listener that they are not alone in their joy or strife. I believe that it is this innate talent that has given Blue Rodeo such longevity and a fan base that spans generations. When Blue Rodeo’s debut album Outskirts was released in 1987 I was just a kid of 7 years old. My eldest sister however, well into her teens, had become an avid fan of the band and I had been exposed to their music initially through her. (Thanks sis!) After years of connecting with each album they released, and singing along each time a Blue Rodeo song came on the radio, one thing that eluded me was why I had never made the effort to see one of their live shows. It was not due to lack of opportunity, as they’ve performed in Edmonton on numerous occasions. I’m a concert-goer so it hasn’t been due to an apathy towards live performances. I have always heard good things about Blue Rodeo’s live shows but for one excuse or another I had never made it to one. When Blue Rodeo announced that their 25th Anniversary Tour would include 2 nights in Edmonton at the Northern Alberta Jubilee Auditorium, I committed myself to finally go and see what I’ve been missing all these years. Blue Rodeo has a rich sound that really benefits from an establishment with good acoustics like “The Jube.” This being their anniversary tour, I knew the show would include many of my beloved favourites, and I was not disappointed. Popular hits like ‘Try’, ‘Hasn’t Hit Me Yet’, and ‘Lost Together’ found their way into the evening’s set. One thing that struck me was how well they performed. Not that I expected a butchered performance or anything, but to sound as good live (if not better) than on a produced recording is a true feat. Every high note hit, and each key in time, I was impressed. While many of their songs are melodic and harmonious, they aren’t without complexity, and it was just refreshing to see them show how skilfully they can play. Each band member had solos throughout the night, however the most notable were those of keyboardist Michael Boguski. This guy stole the show. You just felt it. Every key, pure soul. There was one instant when Greg Keelor wasn’t 100% thrilled with how a song was going and stopped mid-song stating “These people paid good money to be here. We can do better than that!” and started the song again from the beginning. Blue Rodeo has always had that likeable band personality; Simple everyday guys who care about what they do, want their fans to have a good time and leave feeling inspired in one way or another. This is one of the other things that appeals to people and something that you don’t get to see by simply listening to an album. You really get a feel for band dynamics and personality by watching members interact onstage. Watching Jim Cuddy and Greg Keelor was like watching two brothers who have seen it all and done it all together. There is an undeniable depth and chemistry to their relationship. I had previously mentioned that Blue Rodeo’s fan base spanned generations, and the audience that filled The Jubilee Auditorium definitely supported that notion. Teens, golden aged, and everyone in between, could be seen tapping their feet or singing along in the crowd. I think that is what happens when an artist’s range is so wide. Blue Rodeo is categorized as a country rock band, but their sound transcends the confines of just one or two musical genres. There are elements of blues, pop and soul scattered throughout their songs and performances. During the Edmonton show I attended, there was a moment during the song ‘After The Rain’ when I was quite certain Aretha Franklin had possessed Jim Cuddy onstage. It was amazing. The band even performed the old gospel song ‘Somebody Touched Me’. The rendition was so good it rivalled many of the artists that recorded the song back in the 60s. It is my guess that this ability to successfully cross musical genres and reach people in a wide range of demographics comes from a bona fide and deep love of all types of music, and a historical understanding of how each type came into being and why they were necessary; really relating to people of all backgrounds and with a different story. From the southern lady in the church choir, to the small town boy trying to find his way, Blue Rodeo has found away to understand, feel and give voice to so many. In fact, right before performing ‘Fools Like You’, the band took a moment to bring awareness to the Idle No More movement, once again showing the band’s unwavering dedication and support of those who are politically or socially disadvantaged. I left the January 9th concert feeling motivated, entertained, impressed and with the realization that before seeing Blue Rodeo live, I had no idea how powerful and important their place is in the Canadian music scene.


Releases, Reviews and Reverie

By Stacey Mullings

Shout Out Out Out Out Spanish Moss and Total Loss Normals Welcome Records After much anticipation on my part, and likely on the part of many Shout Out Out Out Out fans, the electro band’s third album, ‘Spanish Moss and Total Loss’ was released in July of this year, and as expected, it did not disappoint. When considering a band like Shout Out Out Out Out, expectations can be placed quite high. Time after time, they present a body of work that evidences just how passionate they are about their craft, and shows a level of expertise and artistry that’s pretty flooring. The highly skilled and complex instrumentation found in Spanish Moss and Total Loss is so fluid and cohesive that it produces melodic and accessible pieces which is undoubtedly a science in itself. A myriad of instruments including two drummers, four bassists, analog synths, Rhodes piano, baritone guitar and saxophone work in unison to construct an album that is pensive, relatable, thought provoking, and just really cool. The mood is one of profound reflection. Lead singer and multi-instrumentalist Nik Kozub stated “As on our previous two albums, I sing through an old analog vocoder, and lyrically I try to tackle my own demons, dreaming of a life where I can just stay on vacation forever, not having to deal with being broke all the time or be reminded of personal failures.” Despite the heavy lyrical content, listening to the album from start to finish does not feel like a depressing or taxing experience at all, more of a journey through truly inspired sound. Having seen Shout Out Out Out Out’s live performance on numerous occasions in different cities, I can say with conviction that they bring a certain explosive energy that ignites and already amped audience regardless of where they play. I think we can expect to see more great things from this band. Poolside Pacific Standard Time Day & Night Recordings Filip Nikolic and Jeffrey Paradise, also known as Poolside, introduced their brand of contemporary groove soul pop with the release of their debut album, ‘Pacific Standard Time’. The LA-based duo’s relaxed, feel-good sound was an instant party favourite over the summer. Pacific Standard Time sets the scene for a chilled out beach party over looking a California sunset and makes it virtually impossible to sit still while listening. Poolside’s rendition of Neil Young’s Harvest Moon is a whole new take on the folksy classic, placing it under a downtempo beat. Both Nikolic and Paradise had already earned the respect of music aficionados prior to teaming up together to create Poolside. They have worked with some notable artists in both the electro and indie rock genres. With Nikolic, playing with Ima Robot and touring with Junior Senior, and Paradise fronting The Calculators (members later went on to form The Rapture), they brought a strong fan base along with them when they decided to form Poolside. Being DJs of discriminating taste, Nikolic and Paradise put out a solid, 16-track album with the kind of music they would like to hear at a beach party or LA nightclub. As the last of the few dog days of summer come to a close, Pacific Standard Time is definitely one to pick up at the record store, drop the needle and kick back. Thesecond track, ‘Next To You’ is a personal favourite. If Poolside makes a video for this one, they must cast Pam Grier!)


Lou Salomé

By Tracey Ellis

Lou Salomé is a music artist from France, and as you would expect from the birthplace of haute-couture, she exudes class, sophistication, and charm along with her musical talent. Sitting in her Parisian apartment near Bastille, she is a figure of chicness in her skinny jeans, silk blouse and trendy shoe boots, enhanced by simple silver jewellery and the hint of a dirty laugh; the effortlessly stylish image all Parisians seem to possess. A Diane Kruger lookalike (but with a trendy, curly, bob) and a sultry voice like Shakira, Lou is a sexy siren full of soul, French style. And with performing in clubs all around Paris and the south of France, she is busy too. Having just released her second album in France - My Art Belongs to Dad - Lou is now ready to conquer the world; well, the English-speaking world at least. Inspired and influenced by the likes of Serge Gainsbourg, The Mitsouko, Bashung, Sting, and the great singers of jazz, her bilingual album is an eclectic mix of soul, jazz, pop and funk. The album has all the contours of hope and celebrations of life, along with a mixture of the fragility and forces of nature. It is also a heartfelt dedication to her father who died of cancer. “Singing has always been a spirit inside me; an intense passion. I connect intimately with the music and sing to express myself and my emotions”, says Lou. “Inspiration for this album came to me like an earthquake after my father died, it flowed quickly and naturally.” Lou began singing as a child, letting her voice echo down the stairs of her parents home in the south of France. A hidden ambition for many years, it was only a few years ago she decided to take it more seriously, writing and co-composing her first album in 2008 ‘Tic Tac Mania’. At this time the identity of Lou Salomé was not born yet, but the first steps of her musical journey had begun. “The singing was deep-rooted since my early childhood, so deep that I did nothing to indulge it for all those years. Then one day it became clear, and I understood that I had to engage with my passion and dare to share these things that have always resonated within me.” A relative newcomer in the music industry, Lou started her career at age 34, a bit late perhaps in the age of youth claiming fame younger and younger. What she does bring to the musical table is grace and soul, as well as experience in many different genres of music, allowing her to realise that she does not want to be locked in to just one classifiable genre. With the confidence to pursue her dream and the talent to back it up, her music is beginning to cross oceans and transcend borders with the help of her music collaborator and childhood friend - Carine Bonnefoy - a renowned pianist and jazz composer in France. With their eyes set on Canadian Folk Festivals, concert halls, and clubs, Lou is excited by touring a bilingual country such as Canada. “I want to hear English-speaking people singing my songs in French, and French people singing my songs in English, crossing borders to embrace each other in universality.” Onstage Lou does not disappoint, to the ears, or to the eyes. Extremely watchable, her style is uniquely hers; feminine, bohemian, and sexy combined with nostalgic flair. “I’m influenced by the 20’s”, says Lou. “I love the materials that make you so elegant and feminine, the pearls, the feathers, the (false) fur and the women’s liberalization that occurs during this period. Coco Chanel was a precursor of this trend and I love her work for that.” One of the first women to wear trousers, cut her hair and reject the corset was Coco Chanel. Probably the most influential woman in fashion of the 20th century, Chanel did much to further the emancipation and freedom of women’s fashion. And if you think the name ‘Lou Salome’ sounds familiar, you are right. The singer chose her stage name based on the Russian-born Lou Andreas-Salome, one of the first women psychoanalysts who dared to write about female sexuality. Lou has based her image on the free-spirited nature of this woman, and her vintage Chanel flair echoes this theme onstage, through her image and her music. What does she like to wear when performing? “I love to wear heels, false fur, peacock feathers, and a pearl garland on my head. I love to wear also cuffs on my wrists and lace...I love to mix the styles of the 20’s with a contemporary style. I love sophisticated materials as well as fur or feather that illustrates the animal part we have all in us.” Signature items? “I always wear a pearl headband and peacock feathers, I used them for the album cover. When I was a child, I was fascinated by the beauty of this bird. I found it bizarre, mysterious and marvellous in the same time, different. I love the feather, it looks like an eye, maybe the third eye, who knows?!! It is for me the eye of the child I was, all what made me from my childhood until today, all the life experiences and the memories.” As she prepares for a string of concerts in the south of France, Lou is nervous, as always. When I ask her how she deals with her nerves, she gives me a quote from Oscar Wilde: “Shoot for the moon, if you miss, you’ll land among the stars”. As Lou has proved, it’s never to late to shoot for the moon, and there is no doubt that wherever she goes, she has star quality. Look out for Lou Salome performing across Canada next year. In the meantime check out her album on her website http://www.lousalome.fr/en, Spotify or Amazon.


©2013 PHABRIK Magazine